Building Performance Metrics Dashboards for Mobile Freemium Games

Let’s take a moment to appreciate the largest title of a post of this blog to date. Building Performance Metrics Dashboards for Mobile Freemium Games is a mouthful and is exactly what we’ll discuss today.

Let’s dive right in. Continue reading

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Retention and Churn

This post was written 10 months ago… yep, right after Retention 101. Since then it has been in an out of the publishing queue. I’ve been picking up things to improve it but it doesn’t make sense to keep it out… and it took too long really! I wanted to improve it beyond this but it’s better to simply publish it and follow up if I make up my mind about what is that magical improvement than to leave it lingering in the Drafts section any longer.

This post is about ways of measuring retention, how each of them relates with true churn and which should be used.

Retention 101 post was an overall intro. I gave the formula generally used to calculate retention and mentioned there are other ways of calculating it. This post is about those additional formulas, namely rolling retention and rolling window retention and also about churn.

Each retention formula has strengths and weaknesses. Some are more adequate for reporting, other’s for modelling and each has a different relationship with churn. Let’s start! Continue reading

Databases and tables for game analytics

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It has been some time so let’s recap how we got here. First I gave an overview of what a game analytics stack can be. Then I moved to the planning stage pointing the steps from zero to data science. In the last couple of posts in this category I wrote about basic events. First how to think and define them, later on the structure of the data created from those events. The last couple of posts were about user state, what it is and how we can use it.

I think it is abundantly clear that there is method in the madness! Today I’ll write about the databases and tables needed for basic reporting. Not only the definition of the fields but also different structures and technical considerations.  Continue reading

Learning data science with John Oliver

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You know this guy, right? In case you don’t, he is John Oliver, an english comedian with a perspective on the modern world that can only be matched by his distinctive voice!

I saw the video below sometime ago. In it, John Oliver presents in his usual style what is wrong with how science is used and presented. I won’t discuss the large amount of pet peeves I have with what I see on mainstream media or shared on Facebook regarding science or the lack of it. It would be out of context, too long and, to be intellectually honest, incredibly boring especially after John’s tremendous piece.

Instead I want to invite to watch the video in case you haven’t and I’ll tell you why I believe his views are important in the context of data science also.  Continue reading

Do you want to work on my team?

Going slightly off rail from the typical Tuesday posting because I’m looking for a data analyst for my team. And what better place to announce it than right here in THE blog?!

Check the job description here

But On Games n’ Data wouldn’t be On Games n’ Data if I didn’t try to go a little bit deeper into this. So what can I tell you that the job description doesn’t say already? What can I say that will excite you to apply or tell that data geeky friend of yours that this is really cool?!

Well, for starters, data geeks will feel right at home! We deal and discuss about all things that interact with data. From algorithms to visualisations, from product management to server backends.

Another thing that seems to impress people is the scope and size of our day to day operations. Our super awesome data engineering team, with which you would have the pleasure of interact, collects and treats over 1 billion rows of data from dozens of data sources, related with our 22 million daily active users.

What do our data analysts do with it? From ad hoc analysis to user research, from randomised controlled trials to reporting dashboards. We use mostly R (yep, coding is a pre-requisite) and work with large scale databases in Redshift and MySQL.

If this sounds like something you’d love to do or know someone who would, here’s the link again… just in case… Check the job description here

Beautiful Visualisation: The Fallen of WWII

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According to the website…

The Fallen of World War II is an interactive documentary that examines the human cost of the second World War and the decline in battle deaths in the years since the war.

I took this screenshot because it fits the description. But neither the description or the screenshot are fair to this visualisation. This is a true masterpiece. It is a data visualisation and a documentary. A short movie and an experiment. It is art, history, data. It is about death and hope. It is dark yet vibrant.

I want to tell you more… and I want to share the video in this page… but I’ll fight the urge and won’t do either. I won’t spoil and I won’t embed because I want to invite you to visit the website, try the interactive visualisation and watch the documentary… if you are at work be sure you have 18 minutes.

Visit The Fallen of World War II

 

DSAA Call to Papers

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Hi everyone! I know we’ve skipped a couple of weeks. It’s the first time it happened unplanned and hopefully it won’t happen often.

And a good way to get back into action is to announce the Data Science and Advanced Analytics Conference that will be held at Montréal between 17th and 19th of October 2016.

The organisation is calling for papers. If you wish to know more or submit your paper, follow the links below.

http://gamedatascience.org/
https://www.ualberta.ca/~dsaa16/

See you all next week!